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Pere Renom

“We have given you, O Adam, no visage proper to yourself, nor endowment properly your own, in order that whatever place, whatever form, whatever gifts you may, with premeditation, select, these same you may have and possess through your own judgement and decision […] We have made you a creature neither of heaven nor of earth, neither mortal nor immortal, in order that you may, as the free and proud shaper of your own being, fashion yourself in the form you may prefer.”
Oration on the Dignity of Man – Giovanni Pico della Mirandola

Archeology of a shipwreck

published on 9 01 2019

In the first century BC, a Roman ship sailing along the Costa Brava (Girona) was surprised by a storm, hit the Formigues Islands and was shipwrecked. Its remains were preserved intact at 45 m depth for 2,000 years. The Center of Underwater Archeology of Catalonia (CASC) carries out an excavation campaign to study the loading of hundreds of amphoras and to understand the construction process of the ship. Until now it was believed that Roman ships could not navigate the Atlantic, the analysis of thousands of amphoras shows that they maintained maritim routes to Britain and Germany.
The following spoke: Gustau Vivar, CASC director, Rut Geli, CASC archaeologist, Caterina Aguer, restorer of CASC, Xavier Rubio, professor of archeology at the University of Edinburgh and Pere Izquierdo, archaeologist of the Sitges Museums.